Time to Act on Dementia, Time to Act on Alzheimers

The World Alzheimer's Month 2024 campaign, Time to act on dementia, Time to act on Alzheimer’s, will focus raising awareness and on addressing the stigma and discrimination which still exists around dementia.

The campaign theme for World Alzheimer’s Month 2024 is ‘Time to Act on Dementia, Time to Act on Alzheimers’

Every September, ADI organises the World Alzheimer’s Month campaign in collaboration with its member associations from all across the world, to highlight and campaign on specific issues which directly affect those living with dementia their carers.

The 2024 World Alzheimer’s Month campaign will centre around the taglines ‘Time to act on dementia, Time to act on Alzheimer’s’. The global awareness raising campaign focusses on attitudes toward dementia and seeks to redress stigma and discrimination which still exists around the condition, while highlighting the positive steps being undertaken by organisations and governments globally to develop a more dementia friendly society.

Access the 2024 campaign materials:

English    French    Spanish 

World Alzheimer Report 2024

Available on the 21st of September 2024, this year’s World Alzheimer Report will take a deep dive into the current perceptions of dementia by those living with the condition, carers, health care practitioners and the general public. Building on the 2019 World Alzheimer Report: Attitudes to dementia, ADI has once again commissioned the London School of Economics, as we seek to understand how these attitudes have changed over 5 years.

The 2019 World Alzheimer Report: Attitudes to dementia found that 62% of health care practitioners wrongly considered dementia to be a normal part of ageing; 35% of carers had hidden a diagnosis of dementia and 1 in 4 of the general public thought there was nothing which could be done about dementia, underscoring the importance of this campaign. ADI is revisiting the survey that underpinned the 2024 report, to see what changes in attitudes to dementia can be seen around the world.

Learn more about ADI’s World Alzheimer Reports